Courses

Core Courses

GS/DMG 5010 3.0 Foundations of Digital Media

Students attain core literacy in mathematical, systems/process, and computational bases for digital media, including sound, image, and 3D environments, and learn the essential skills of postgraduate-level research in areas of digital media. Core literacies include: DSP, sound synthesis, FFT, the graphics pipeline, transformations, lighting, shading, and procedural methods. These core literacies support work across areas including information and systems theory, digital signal processing, 3D geometry, software design, acoustics, simulation and complex systems, networking, human-computer interaction, etc. Core literacies are contextualized by reference to exemplary projects in diverse practices of computational art, music, video games, information visualization, web-based media, responsive architecture, physical computing, etc., including the examination of landmark texts and projects in digital media spanning the past century, addressing the continual overlap between artistic and scientific practices. Literacy is evaluated through the ability to understand and transfer published research in these fields into creative applications, recreating established research results, projects, or works of specific interest to the student’s research area(s).

GS/DMG 5020 3.0 Advanced Vertical Studio/Lab I

Teams of students work collaboratively on a large-scale project that tackles a well-defined research problem spanning art and science methods and practices. The problem domain will be defined by contexts such as a research laboratory of a Digital Media faculty member or an outside organization, in order to explore a range of research approaches and issues, professional and research ethics, and reflective practice within academic, professional and arts contexts. An important component is the discussion of critical issues related to cultural interactions with new and emerging technologies, including an appreciation of how art-making practices have shaped, and been shaped by, trajectories of technological change. The Advanced Vertical Studio/Lab will normally be taken in the second year of the program. There is a possibility for student teams to be co-supervised by program faculty and a program associate, which is a practitioner from an outside organization (for-profit -Ubisoft, not-for-profit, NGO, arts festival, trade organization, artist collective, design group, museum, MCC). Program associates may not be the sole supervisor.

GS/DMG 6020 3.0 Advanced Vertical Studio/Lab II

Students will lead a team of Masters students working collaboratively on a large-scale project that tackles a well-defined research problem spanning art and science methods and practices. Students are expected to take leadership roles. The problem domain will be defined by contexts such as a research laboratory of a Digital Media faculty member or an outside organization, in order to explore a range of research approaches and issues, professional and research ethics, and reflective practice within academic, professional and arts contexts. An important component is the discussion of critical issues related to cultural interactions with new and emerging technologies, including an appreciation of how art-making practices have shaped, and been shaped by, trajectories of technological change. Advanced Vertical Studio/Lab I will normally be taken in the second year of the program. There is a possibility for student teams to be co-supervised by program faculty and a program associate, which is a practitioner from an outside organization (for-profit -Ubisoft, not-for-profit, NGO, arts festival, trade organization, artist collective, design group, museum, MCC). Program associates may not be the sole supervisor.

GS/DMG 6000 0.0 MA/MSc MRP Research

MA/MSc MRP Research

GS/DMG 7000 0.0 Ph.D. Dissertation

Ph.D. Dissertation

Depth Courses

GS/DMG 5200 3.0 Experimental Telepresence

This course engages the Internet as a medium for performance, exploring the concept of remote presence through personal and group projects. Students collaborate on multimedia performance pieces with partner universities in order to develop their own aesthetic vision of this largely-uncharted territory in a way that challenges established notions of audience participation, staging, human/agent interaction and inter-performer dialogue.

GS/DMG 5960 3.0 Applications of Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence to the Performing Arts

This course allows students to apply cutting edge research in machine learning and artificial intelligence to the performing arts, with particular emphasis on music and sonic arts, dance and movement arts, and performance art. Different paradigms for modeling behaviour will be explored (human perception/cognition, artificial evolution, agent-based systems), as well as critical questions surrounding machine creativity and intentionality.

GS/DMG 5510 3.0 Physical Computing III

Builds on the material covered in Introduction to Physical Computing II to explore more advanced topics in physical computing such as circuit board design and manufacturing, embedded computing, communications and protocols, among other topics, with an emphasis on research-creation in the development of novel projects. During the course students will develop a larger work for public presentation.

GS/DMG 5520 Spatial Computing and Responsive Environments

This course addresses 3D space as a creative computational medium, by weaving theory, practice, software, and code drawn from research in human-computer interaction (HCI), mixed reality (a spectrum of merging real and virtual space, including virtual reality and augmented reality), computer vision, computer graphics, embodied and natural interaction, projection-mapping, ambient intelligence, and responsive environments. Students will develop responsive environments, utilizing technologies such as RGB-D cameras, stereoscopic projections, head-mounted displays, and loudspeaker arrays.

GS/DMG 5940 3.0 Generative and parametric modelling

Explores the techniques of generative and parametric 3D modeling through the use of scripting and programming interfaces to professional grade render-time 3D modeling software tools such as Rhinoceros/Grasshopper, Maya, Solid Works, and Blender, and real-time 3D graphics tools and software such as Max, Processing, and software libraries such as OpenFrameworks, and Cinder which incorporate OpenGL and GLSL Shading Languages. These tools represent two domains, where one domain is geared toward the development of fixed content and 3D fabrication; the other is primarily virtual and interactive. A generative and parametric 3D modeling approach facilitates the integration of these two domains, whereby there is a real-time, interactive approach to the development of spatial content. Because the techniques presented in this course have wide implications, concepts and approaches will draw from fields of architecture, industrial design, art making, and other fields where computational methods are use to create 3D objects and forms.

GS/DMG 5950 3.0 Artificial Life, Generative Art and Creative Code

This course addresses computation as a creative medium from a biologically-inspired standpoint to develop artworks, adaptive media and simulations approaching the fascinating complexity of nature. Frameworks explored in the course include complex dynamical systems, fractals, cellular automata, agent-based systems, evolutionary and developmental programming, artificial chemistries, and ecosystems.

GS/DANC 5221 3.0 - GS/THEA 5221 3.0 The Interactive Stage

This course explores the creation of interactive stage environments for live performance. Students investigate various strategies whereby on-stage 'events' (physical, vocal, physiological, etc.) manipulate audio, video and/or lighting events. Students are introduced to dedicated interactive and show control software, and become adept at programming interactive environments.

GS/DMG 5990 3.0 Directed Reading

Students have the option of taking a Directed Reading course with any faculty member appointed to the Program, provided a suitable graduate course is not available in the current curriculum, and provided the course does not overlap significantly with a course taken previously. In all cases, the course will be directly relevant to the student’s thesis/dissertation project.

GS/EECS 5323 3.00 Computer Vision

This course introduces the basic concepts in Computer Vision. Primarily a survey of current computational methods, we begin by examining methods for measuring visual data (image based operators, edge detection, feature extraction), and low-level processes for feature aggregation (optic flow, segmentation, correspondence). Finally, we consider some issues in "high-level" vision by examining current high-level vision systems.

GS/EECS 5324 3.00 Introduction to Robotics

This course introduces concepts in Robotics. The course begins with a study of the mechanics of manipulators and robot platforms. Trajectory and course planning, environmental layout and sensing are discussed. Finally, high-level concerns are introduced. The need for real-time response and dynamic-scene analysis are covered, and recent development in robotics systems from an Artificial Intelligence viewpoint are discussed.

GS/EECS 5326 3.00 Artificial Intelligence

This course will be an in-depth treatment of one or more specific topics within the field of Artificial Intelligence. Integrated with the undergraduate course Computer Science 4401.03.

GS/EECS 5327 3.00 Introduction to Machine Learning and Pattern Recognition

Machine learning is the study of algorithms that learn how to perform a task from prior experience. This course introduces the student to machine learning concepts and techniques applied to pattern recognition problem in a diversity of application areas.

GS/EECS 5331 3.00 Advanced Topics in 3D Computer Graphics

This course introduces advanced 3D computer graphics algorithms. Topics may include direct programming of graphics hardware via pixel and vertex shaders, real-time rendering, global illumination algorithms, advanced texture mapping and anti-aliasing, data visualization.

GS/EECS 5351 3.00 Human-Computer Interaction

This course introduces the concepts and technology necessary to design, manage and implement interactive software. Students work in small groups and learn how to design user interfaces, how to realize them and how to evaluate the end result. Both design and evaluation are emphasized.

GS/EECS 5443 3.00 Mobile User Interfaces

This course teaches the design and implementation of user interfaces for touchscreen phones and tablet computers. Students develop user interfaces that include touch, multi-touch, vibration, device motion, position, and orientation, environment sensing, and video and audio capture. Lab exercises emphasise these topics in a practical manner.

GS/EECS 6324 3.00 From Control to Actuators

A "robot building course", this course will follow the issues involved in building a robot or robotic system from control to actuators. This includes microcomputer control, actuator design, high-level software models, and sensor inputs. Prerequisites: EECS 5324 3.0 Introduction to Robotics, previous experience in electronics would be an asset.

GS/PSYC 6315 3.00 - GS/EECS 6326 3.00 Principles of Human Perception and Performance in Human-Computer Interactions

This course considers the role of human perception in human-computer interaction particularly computer generated graphics/sound and immersive virtual reality. Fundamental findings from sensory physiology and perceptual psychophysics are presented in the context of interface and display design.

GS/EECS 6328 3.00 Speech and Language Processing

Introducing the latest technologies in speech and language processing, including speech and recognition and understanding, key-word spotting, spoken language processing, speaker identification and verification, statistical machine translation, information retrieval, and other interesting topics.

GS/EECS 6329 3.00 Advanced Human-Computer Interaction

This course examines advanced concepts and technologies for Human-Computer Interaction. Students will learn about advanced input and output devices (e.g. for mobile computing and/or Virtual Reality), about advanced design methods, how to implement effective interfaces, and how to perform rapid, effective iterative user tests.

GS/EECS 6330 3.00 Critical Technical Practise: Computer Accessibility and Assistive Technology

Many interactive systems strive to afford the same mechanisms to human users that are used in face-to-face conversation. This course examines the formal models and computational techniques that concern the pragmatics of language use that such systems employ.

GS/EECS 6331 3.00 Advanced Image Synthesis

This course concentrates on raster algorithms for image synthesis. Some of the topics may include visible surface algorithms, modelling, shading, global illumination, anti-aliasing, and texture mapping. Prerequisites: EECS 5331 3.0 Introduction to Computer Graphics.

GS/EECS 6335 3.00 Topics in Virtual Reality

This course considers how to present to a user a compelling illusion of being in an alternate (virtual) reality. It considers how humans perceive visual, audio, haptic and other perceptual inputs, and how technology can be used to stimulate these senses appropriately to simulate some virtual environment Prerequisite: Computer Science 4471 3.0: “Introduction to Virtual Reality” or equivalent is recommended

GS/EECS 6337 3.00 3D User Interfaces

The course introduces the ways to interact with computers in a three dimensional (3D) environment, where the environment is either fully virtual or represents a mixture of real and virtual. It covers topics ranging from the hardware necessary to interface with virtual worlds, over techniques for interacting with 3D environments, to design and evaluation of 3D user interfaces.

GS/EECS 6340 3.00 Embodied Intelligence

This course is intended as a follow-on from a first course on Artificial Intelligence. Whereas such first courses focus on the important foundations of AI, such a Knowledge Representation or Reasoning, this course will examine how these separate foundational elements can be integrated into real systems. This will be accomplished by detailing some general overall concepts that form the basis of intelligent systems in the real world, and then presenting a number of in-depth cases studies of a variety of systems from several applications domains. The embodiment of intelligence may be in a physical system (such as a robot) or a software system (such as in game-playing) but in both cases, the goal is to interact with, and solve a problem in, the real world.

GS/PSYC 6225 3.00 - GS/EECS 6390D 3.00 Computational Models of Visual Perception

This course examines the problem of developing rigorous computational models for visual processing. Computational strategies may draw upon techniques in statistical inference, signal processing, optimization theory, graph theory and distributed computation.

GS/EECS 6412 3.00 Data Mining

This course introduces fundamental concepts of data mining. It presents various data mining technologies, algorithms and applications. Topics include association rule mining, classification models, sequential pattern mining and clustering.

GS/FILM 6246 - GS/CC 8862 3.00 Future Cinema II: Applied Theory

This hands-on course explores new screen technologies on both practical and theoretical levels within in a lab environment, participating in the evolution of emerging media such as virtual and augmented reality. Students are encouraged to think collectively beyond a century of inherited theory and practice, and imagine the moving images and screens of the future, through discussions interwoven with experimental individual and group projects.